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Practical Research

Annals of Long-Term Care
The goal of this study was to characterize key modifiable factors that could affect verbal communication in an adult day care setting, namely prevalence of audiometric hearing loss and the acoustic characteristics in the activity hall.
Annals of Long-Term Care
This retrospective database analysis evaluated the demographic, functional, and clinical characteristics of nursing facility residents (NFR) with Parkinson disease (PD) compared with those with PD psychosis.
Annals of Long-Term Care
We aimed to compare health outcomes of ALF residents with those of age- and sex-matched community-dwelling adults in a retrospective cohort study of 808 older adults.
Annals of Long-Term Care
The purpose of this study was to determine resident and family member priorities for improvements to promote food and fluid intake in LTC and to compare them with the previously published priorities of experts and health care professionals.
Annals of Long-Term Care
This study sought to understand the consistency of ratings over a 3-day test-retest period for how satisfied long-term care recipients were with the fulfillment of important everyday preferences.
Annals of Long-Term Care
Poor oral hygiene has been found to be a significant risk factor for the development of pneumonia as well as to negatively impact overall well-being. 
Annals of Long-Term Care
Quadriplegia is a debilitating comorbidity in the hospital setting. It entails a partial to complete motor/sensory loss of both the upper and lower limbs and torso. It may also involve autonomic, bladder, bowel, and sexual functions. 
Annals of Long-Term Care
Lisa M Avery, PharmD, assessed whether a hospital-based antimicrobial stewardship team could decrease inappropriate fluoroquinolone use at a long-term care facility.
Annals of Long-Term Care
To understand the unique barriers impacting CNA ability to care for patients with dementia, the interprofessional team should consider CNA perspectives and address expressed needs through various levels of support. 
Annals of Long-Term Care
Because older adults are unlikely to ask their health care provider about driving cessation, it is incumbent upon health care providers to recognize the need for and to initiate the “driving conversation” with their older patients.
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