PRACTICAL RESEARCH

Issues and Challenges of Modified-Texture Foods in Long-Term Care: A Workshop Report : Page 3 of 3

July 19, 2012

 

Conclusion

The MTF Research Planning Workshop sought to identify, interpret, and set priorities on key themes emerging from work conducted on MTFs in LTC facilities. We reached a consensus that a better understanding of the prevalence of malnutrition, particularly undernutrition, and the use of commercially and in-house prepared MTFs in LTC facilities is needed to provide segue into further research. Fortification of MTFs with supplemental vitamins and minerals is an additional area for consideration. Future studies should focus on interprofessional, multicenter collaborations that provide large enough sample sizes to demonstrate statistically and clinically significant changes, while remaining sensitive to LTCs being “home” environments for their residents. Laboratory research should be used whenever possible to answer some key MTF research questions in preparation for clinical research. Reliable and validated tools are required that are sensitive in identifying changes in outcome measures, such as satisfaction, weight gain or loss, and food intake, and that can be used in both cognitively intact and cognitively impaired populations. Additional factors, including the physiology of aging, dysphagia, overall mealtime experience, need for feeding assistance, standardization of MTF production and delivery, and cost of MTFs, must be considered when determining the feasibility, sustainability, and policy implications of using MTFs in LTC facilities. 

 

Acknowledgment

Funding for the Modified-Texture Food Research Planning Workshop was provided in part by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Meeting, Planning and Dissemination Grant, and a grant from the Bruyère Research Institute.

 

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Disclosures: 

The authors report no relevant financial relationships.

 

Address correspondence to:

Helen Niezgoda, BScN, MSc

Bruyère Research Institute

43 Bruyère Street

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1N 5C8

hniezgoda@bruyere.org